Tag: marketing

THE PIN-UP STAKES: Clarifications

by on Jan.24, 2011

* This is a post-script of sorts to my original post THE PIN-UP STAKES: Poetry & the Marketing of Poetry. [for the below I’m paraphrasing and reorganizing replies I made in the comments field of the original post, as well as in the comments field to Mike Kitchell’s post about The Pin-Up Stakes on HTML Giant – thanks especially to Jackie Wang for her engagement]

WHY A MARKETING MODEL?

The central concern of a marketing model is the communication of an idea (or thought, or vision) via the image. This is precisely the concern of the image artist. I would argue, for example, that Jon Leon’s poetry is not poetry but the idea of poetry. As he’s said before, “Poetry is not why you come to poetry.” This is a strategic insight shared by Leon and marketing VPs, and they share a set of tropes as well: in place of Stevens’ palm at the end of the mind we have Leon’s “Beverly Hills of the Mind,” in which the idea of Beverly Hills is more Beverly Hills than Beverly Hills is. This is not to say that Leon is engaging in some kind of trite ironic critique via appropriation. I would argue that he is not critiquing this strategy or these tropes at all. In fact I think he uses them because he feels they are effective. He likes them, and follows Stevens’ adage of “It must give pleasure.” You could argue that many people won’t be able to tell the difference between what Leon is doing and what an ad agency or some asshole is doing, and that this approach could easily lead to a reinforcement of the status quo. I would not disagree with this, but it misses the point. What matters is that his objective is to assert the infinitude of thought, and his tactics are slyly and not-so-slyly disruptive all along the audience expectation spectrum, from staunch conservative to radical leftist. This is what makes him a prototypical pin-up artist. He welcomes and fucks with everyone.
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THE PIN-UP STAKES: Poetry & the Marketing of Poetry

by on Jan.14, 2011

I. THE POET AS IMAGE ARTIST

“When Duran Duran arrived on the pop scene in 1980, they were scoffed at a good deal. A poor man’s Spandau Ballet, people said, in their clumsy new romantic gear; all breeches and frilly shirts and not much future. They looked…well, provincial. Yet four years later, not only are Duran Duran one of the hottest groups in the world, but they’ve cultivated an image of sophisticated, even languid, jet-setters. They appear to inhabit a world of glamorous places, designer clothes, champagne, travel and beautiful girls. Duran Duran are not much interested in being the boys next door. Every one of their singles has been a chart hit, they’ve released three best-selling LPs and excited hysterical devotion among hordes of young girls. They belong to an elite corps of young British acts (along with Eurythmics, Culture Club and the Thompson Twins) who have shaken up the American music scene with a new look, a new sound and the encouraging ability to shift vast quantities of records. In the last four years, Duran Duran have played before royalty, seen Is There Something I Should Know enter the charts at number one, spent a year in tax exile, and had their every affair or indiscretion splashed across the front pages. They’ve received few kind words from the music critics, but that doesn’t seem to matter; their popularity among young pop fans everywhere is rivaled only by that of Culture Club. And in the pin-up stakes, there’s no one who even comes close.” – Maria David, Duran Duran

“A lot of people didn’t like me. Most of them were poets. They called me names like proletarian, idealist, romantic, handsome. Fools I thought. Why would people sell themselves short and not just live the life of pure creative glamour. It was easy for me, to others it was a mirage. The real geniuses of history were the ones brave enough to be it. I couldn’t understand their criticisms to be anything but jealousy. I encouraged their cupidity and became even wilder and more attractive than ever. Around that time I released a book called Mirage, dedicated to my detractors. I won’t brag about its impact, but it was breathtaking.” – Jon Leon, Hit Wave

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The Marketing of Change

by on Sep.12, 2010


I see these ads all over the subway. They’re part of a marketing campaign sponsored by the NYC Department of Homeless Services and the Metropolitan Transportation Authority, and created by Tribeca-based DCF Advertising in 2008. The objective of the campaign is to dissuade New Yorkers from giving money, food, or clothes to homeless panhandlers, and to encourage them instead to call 311 so a “professional outreach services” team can be dispatched to the scene.
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